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Face Masks Will Require SIRIM Cert Or Face Up To RM250K In Fines, Netizens Cry Foul

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All non-medical face masks must have the SIRIM certification, or else manufacturers and importers will face a fine.

According to Bernama, the Domestic Trade And Consumer Affairs Ministry (KPDNHEP) announced that all non-medical face masks either manufactured in Malaysia or imported from overseas must require the SIRIM sticker under the new gazetting of the Non-Medical Face Mask Order 2022 under the Trade Descriptions Act 2011, which will take effect 4 July.

Consumer products, like electronics, require a SIRIM sticker as well.
(Credit: Malay Mail)

The MS SIRIM label must be placed on boxes or packages and be easily visible to consumers.

KPDNHEP in a statement

Products bearing the SIRIM certification mark demonstrates product compliance with national or international standards. Thus, it provides the user with an assurance for safety and reliability.

The ministry hopes that compliance from manufacturers and importers on this issue will reduce the influx of poor quality products into the Malaysian market.

Companies who are found guilty of not complying with the SIRIM requirement can face a RM200,000 fine or up to RM500,000 for a subsequent offense.

Individuals who are found guilty can face a fine up to RM100,000 and/or 3 years jailtime, or a fine up to RM250,000 and/or 5 years jailtime or both.

Credit: Bernama

“Why now?”

Netizens were not pleased with the news, with many finding it suspicious that this kind of requirement only coming to light after 2 years of an active pandemic.

Others are worried this requirement would raise mask prices

Currently, while Malaysia is moving towards the endemic phase, SOPs such as face masks are still required for daily use. As such, face masks have become an additional expense to be borne by the rakyat, one which not all of us can afford.

“What’s the justification?”

Twitter user @FabAshburn questioned the need for such a blanket requirement in the first place, as these face masks are classified as personal protective equipment (PPE) meant for non-medical use.

She goes on to question what kind of requirements these face masks must meet to obtain the certification, especially for PPE that is not of medical-grade.

Although Malaysia and other countries currently also allow the use of cloth masks made of fabric, it is not clear whether cloth masks or similarly fashioned homemade items will be affected.


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Anne Dorall

Anne Dorall

Anne is an advocate of sustainable living and the circular economy, and has managed to mum-nag the team into using reusable containers to tapau food. She is also a proud parent of 4 cats and 1 rabbit.




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