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Montreal architect Claude Provencher dies at 72

His works include Montreal’s World Trade Centre, the welcome pavilion at the National Assembly and the new Champlain Bridge.

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Claude Provencher, considered one of the pioneers of modern urban architecture, died Friday. He was 72.

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Provencher-Roy, the firm he founded with Michel Roy in 1983, announced the news “with great sadness” in a statement on Sunday.

His works include Montreal’s World Trade Centre, which opened in 1992, the J.-A. Desève Pavilion of Université du Québec à Montréal in 1998, the Technopôle Angus development plan in 2014, the welcome pavilion at the National Assembly and the new Champlain Bridge in 2019.

“Looking back at his work, one thing becomes clear: What the metropolis inspired in him, Claude Provencher gave back 100 times over with beauty, finesse and modesty,” the company said.

Provencher and his firm received many awards for their work. Provencher was made a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 2014 and a knight of the Ordre national du Québec in 2021.

“Passionate, enthusiastic, intuitive, constructive, emotional, Claude Provencher contributed greatly, by his aestheticism, his openness and his unwavering commitment to our architectural heritage,” the company’s statement said.

Provencher leaves his partner, Lucie Bouthillette, and his children.



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